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52 Ancestors: Week 52 – Future

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. It has taken me longer than it should but here is the last post in this series.

I didn’t feel qualified to write about the future of our family, so I had a video chat with my nephew Matthew.

He told me that he plans to have one child, as he likes not having brothers and sisters as you don’t have to argue with them. He does like arguing with his Mum though, and when I asked if he thought his child would argue with him he said, “no, they’ll argue with their Mum.”

I asked if he thought he would live in England or Wales like his cousins but he hadn’t thought about that. He would like to see his cousins a couple of times a year as he does now.

Matthew’s career plans reflect the age in which he is growing up. He would like to be a part time gamer on YouTube, and part time scientist. He told me he would like to be the kind of scientist that invents things. His aims are to invent a kind of gun that when you shoot people it changes their age. His other ambition is to invent a time machine.

Matthew is very conscious that time machines would have to be used with care. His main purpose would be to go back in time to prevent murders and other bad things happening. He thought that getting murderers to hit something that prevented a killing taking place would be a good idea. He mentioned that very slight changes to the past could result in people being extinct so it would be important to make only very small changes. I think he has taken some lessons from “Back To The Future.”

Matthew thought that when he is an adult we will still be driving petrol and diesel powered cars, but they might be more eco. We might have sent people to Mars, but only just. Things will not change all that much.

Matthew pointed out that my blog about the future can only be a prediction, I would need his time machine to actually have a sneak preview and to be able to tell you what the future actually looks like.

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52 Ancestors: Week 51 – Holidays

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. Finally I’m at the penultimate blog in the series.

I have quite a lot of photographs of various family members on holiday. There are some I recognise, some with helpful notes on the back, and some that are probably ancestors with “holiday friends” who even they had forgotten the names of. Some tell me where they were visiting and some don’t.

I have picked these two pictures, as we know exactly when and where they were taken, and I know that they are my Grandma and Grandpa, Bessie and Eric Tomlinson.

I love that Grandma is wearing the same dress in both pictures! It is clearly much warmer in Cornwall than the northern most tip of Scotland too. Openwoodgate is the village just outside Belper, Derbyshire where they lived their entire married life. In fact Grandpa lived in no more than 3 houses, all in Openwoodgate, and two of them the halves of a semi-detached.

Ruth and Tony Willmore at John O’Groats 16 September 2018.[3]

Thirty five years later, the sign has been replaced, but the weather hasn’t improved. The photographer offering customised signs is replaced by dodgy selfies.

As far as I know Grandma never left the British Isles, and only ventured onto an aeroplane once, to go to the Isle of Man. Their luggage was delayed or lost so it wasn’t a good experience for her. For Grandma and Grandpa holidays usually meant coach trips. I remember that as soon as the Trent Coach brochure dropped through the letterbox Grandpa jumped on the bus to the travel agency so he could book the front seats on the coach.

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References
  1. Photograph. Bessie and Eric Tomlinson. 26 August 1980. Lands End, Cornwall. Photographer unknown. Collection: Ruth Willmore.
  2. Photograph. Bessie and Eric Tomlinson. 10 August 1981. John O’Groats, Caithness. Photographer unknown. Collection: Ruth Willmore.
  3. Photograph. Ruth and Tony Willmore. 16 September 2018. John O’Groats, Caithness. Photographer Ruth Willmore. Collection: Ruth Willmore
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52 Ancestors: Week 50 – Lines

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I’m nearly there.

I was not sure where to take this prompt and decided to type “Lines” into Google. One of the suggestions was wires which made me think of my Grandfather, Robert Humphrey Hopkinson, who worked at Richard Johnson and Nephew Wireworks in Ambergate, Derbyshire.

Bob Hopkinson, as he was known, was born 23 June 1923 in Derbyshire, the son of Thomas Humphrey Hopkinson and Adelaide May Stewardson. When he was 3 1/2 years old his sister Adelaide Myrtle Hopkinson was born and 10 years later his mother died of throat cancer.

When WW2 broke out Bob was living with his widowed father in Crich. He was working as a farm labourer. I have not yet found his sister on the 1939 Register, but I believe she went to live with her mother’s family.

From 1941 to 1946 Bob served in the RAF.


After the war my grandfather was employed at Richard Johnson and Nephew wireworks in Ambergate. He worked shifts and was, I believe, a die grinder. The wireworks were a major employer for the residents of Crich.[1] They had a factory in Manchester as well as Derbyshire and during the war had supplied galvanised wire for the PLUTO pipeline (pipe line under the ocean).[2]

Advertisement. (1945) The Electrician. 01 June. p. v. https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:W._T._Henley_1945VP.jpg : accessed 06 February 2022.

In 1956 Richard Johnson and Nephew copper tape and steel armouring wire was used in the first transatlantic telephone cable. I can only imagine that my grandfather was involved in this in some way.[3]

In 1950 he was involved in an accident at work, his niece told me, “his arm was caught in one of the machines and it was only due to the quick thinking of another employee turning off the machinery that his injuries were not more severe. His arm was seriously ‘mangled’ and he spent some time in hospital. To save his arm the surgeons took some bone from his leg and grafted it to his arm. I don’t know if you remember he always walked with a slight limp and his arm was slightly misshapen but at least he could use it.”[5]

The local newspaper did not make the accident sound as serious as his niece. His arm still was affected over 25 years later. (c) Reach PLC. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.[4]
I think Bob Hopkinson is right at the back in the centre pane of the left hand window.
Jack Oldham’s retirement. Photo courtesy Crich Heritage Partnership[1]

Granpa retired in about 1984 and about ten years later the factory closed. Images of the closed factory can be seen here. https://www.derelictplaces.co.uk/threads/ambergate-wireworks.34614/ and here https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnorme/with/8408447021/ It looks very sad and neglected.

That has all changed again and the site is now home to a whisky distillery. White Peak Distillery have made their home at the former Johnson & Nephew Wire Works, in what is now the Derwent Valley UNESCO World Heritage site, with the still placed in what Bob Hopkinson would have known as the old Maintenance and Stores Sheds.[6] Their first whisky, Wire Works Whisky, was released just last week, and I cannot wait to try it. They also produce rum and gin. My next visit to Derbyshire will have to include a distillery tour so I can see where Granpa made wire and whisky is now made.

While writing this I have learned that there is another connection the Johnson and Nephew company. Our closest neighbours when we lived in Cheshire in the early 1980s were part of the Johnson family who had recently sold the company. It is a small world!

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References
  1. Patilla, Peter. Johnson and Nephew Ambergate Wireworks. http://www.crichparish.co.uk/newwebpages/wireworks2.html : accessed 06 February 2022.
  2. Grace’s Guide Ltd. Richard Johnson and Nephew. https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Richard_Johnson_and_Nephew : accessed 06 February 2022.
  3. Burns. Bill. Richard Johnson & Nephew. https://atlantic-cable.com/CableCos/RichardJohnson/index.htm : accessed 06 February 2022.
  4. Derby Daily Telegraph. (1950) Ambergate Accident. Derby Daily Telegraph. 28 August. p. 12c. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000521/19500828/062/0012 : accessed 21 December 2020.
  5. Bowler, B. (2010) Re: Hopkinson. Email to Ruth Willmore, 22 August, 15:27.
  6. White Peak Distillery Ltd. The Wire Works. https://www.whitepeakdistillery.co.uk/waiting-for-whisky/ : accessed 06 February 2022.
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52 Ancestors: Week 49 – Handmade

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

There was never any question over who this prompt would be about. It always had to be about my Mum. She is one of the most talented needlewomen I know.

I have just had a look through her Facebook page and here are some of her makes from 2021. Many of the quilts and blankets are given to charities such as Project Linus.

All images above (c) Vera Hopkinson 2021.

I just had a quick look around our house for things Mum has made, there are the living room curtains, and two patchwork duvet covers. These are just a selection of what I found on a very quick look. I’m afraid I’ll offend her by what is left out!

I asked her how it all began. After all, she was crafting long before I was born. I remember wearing handmade clothes as a young child. There were some jumpers that were knitted in three different sizes so that I could wear them at the same time as my siblings.

Images: Photograph. Vera Hopkinson knitting. 01 July 2018. Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochant. Max Hopkinson.

“I have been sewing all my life, since before I can remember. I say that because I remember a pot holder at my maternal grandmother’s house that was always called “Vera”. It was a pretty scruffy thing and I remember asking, when I was aged about 8 why it has my name, and the answer was that I had given it to my Grandma as a Christmas present when I was 3. I can only assume my Paternal Grandmother who lived next door to us had been the one to get me to make it.

Some of my earliest memories are of being taught to use my Grandma’s treadle sewing machine. I wasn’t tall enough to reach the pedal, so she would sit me on her knee and she would operate the treadle while I guided the fabric under the needle. When I was about 7 she started teaching me embroidery and when I was 8 I was entering competitions run by the local Methodist church. I don’t think I ever won, but when I cleared out my mother’s house I found some of the work I had done, and I had difficulty believing I had been so young when I did it.

I learnt to knit in my early teens, and to crochet while I was a student. There aren’t many yarn or fabric crafts I haven’t had a go at. When my children were small I made a lot of their clothes, and they must have felt they were OK because 3 of them asked me to make their wedding dresses. In the event I only made 2, because the 3rd was having quite a short engagement and with my mother being very ill we decided time was too short.

I used to knit for my grandchildren, but now they are older they don’t really like handknits anymore! However, a few years ago one of them insisted in saving up any damaged to toys for my visits because she was sure “Grandma can fix it”

Now there is hardly a day goes by that I don’t get at my sewing machine, usually making patchwork quilts. All the family have several, and I make them for Project Linus, who give them to “Children in need of a hug”. In the evenings while watching TV I usually have either a crochet hook or knitting needles in my hands. During lockdown I gave a number of handmade blankets to people who had lost loved ones. I called them “woolly hugs” because I couldn’t give them the hug they really needed.”

Images: Photograph. Ruth and Tony Willmore. 07 June 2008. Tan-y-Bwlch station, Ffestiniog Railway, Maentwrog. [photographer unknown] Private collection of Ruth and Tony Willmore.
Embroidered by Vera Hopkinson, aged 8.

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52 Ancestors: Week 48 – Strength

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

I initially planned to use this prompt to write someone who demonstrated great strength of character. But I just couldn’t choose anyone, and kept coming back to my 2nd great granduncle, Samuel Fisher, who was an iron puddler. I thought this must have been a job which required great strength. His father, Jessie had been an iron bundler which I am yet to investigate.

From previous reading when I first came across the occupation of iron puddler, I knew it was to do with making cast iron, working with furnaces and so on. I have been intending to visit the museums at Ironbridge to find out more, but well, Covid. I really must get there.

Samuel Fisher was born in about 1849 and lived in Topton, Staffordshire. It was on the 1871 Census[1] that he was a puddler, and two of his younger brothers were puddler’s assistants.

In planning this blog post I googled “iron puddler” which took me to a page on Wikipedia[2] where I learned that puddling was a process for converting pig iron into wrought iron boiling out the silicon, sulphur and phosphorus. A puddler and his assistant would produce about 1.5 tons of iron in a shift. It was hard, hot work with toxic fumes leading to a life expectancy under 40 years. Samuel lived to almost 80 years old[3], he must have been one of the lucky ones.

The Wikipedia page mentioned that U.S. Senator James. J. Davis had written a book[4] about his early experiences of being an iron puddler. He was younger than Samuel Fisher, born in 1873[5] but he was working in the iron mill by the age of 12, so I felt I had to read the book to learn more about the working conditions Samuel would have experienced.

Davis describes a housewife sweating over a batch of biscuits, how the oven makes her hot and bothered. He explains how his job was similar,

“There were five bakings every day and this meant the shoveling in of nearly two tons of coal. In summer I was stripped tot he waist and panting while the sweat poured down across my heaving muscles. My palms and fingers, scorched by the heat, became hardened like goat hoofs, while my skin took on a coat of tan that it will wear forever.

What time I was not stoking the fire, I was stirring the charge with a long iron rabble that weighed some twenty-five pounds. Strap an Oregon boot to your arm and then do calisthenics ten hours in a room so hot it melts your eyebrows and you will know what it is like to be a puddler.”

Davis, James J. (2019) The Iron Puddler : My life in the rolling mills and what came of it. [Kindle version] CAIMAN. https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07V7H6KH2 : accessed 18 January 2022. p.48

Well, I was right about iron puddling being an occupation for a strong person.

Iron puddlers at work

I didn’t finish the book I’m afraid, it got really rather political, in a time where eugenics and communism where widely supported.

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References
  1. Census records. England. Tipton, Staffordshire. 02 April 1871. FISHER, Jessie (head) RD: Tipton. RG10/3000. FL 52. p. 45. ED. 16. http://www.ancestry.co.uk : accessed 21 November 2020.
  2. Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘Iron puddler’, In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Iron_puddler&oldid=1051665209 : accessed 22 January 2022
  3. Deaths index. England. RD Dudley. 1st Qtr. 1928. FISHER, Samuel. Vol. 6b. p. 978. https://www.freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl : accessed 21 November 2020.
  4. Davis, James J. (2019) The Iron Puddler : My life in the rolling mills and what came of it. [Kindle version] CAIMAN. https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07V7H6KH2 : accessed 18 January 2022.
  5. Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘James J. Davis’, In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_J._Davis&oldid=1023190926 : accessed 22 January 2022

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52 Ancestors: Week 47 – Thankful

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

When I saw this prompt I immediately thought of harvest festivals. I clearly remember as a child both school and church celebrations where I made up small hampers of food which were given to those in need. I now realise that in the affluent village in which I grew up, where as the vicar’s kids we were definitely the least well off, I have absolutely no idea where that food ended up.

I remember the flower arranging ladies going to town for harvest festival services, filling the church with displays of fruit and vegetables. It was a farming community and we often celebrated later than other churches, as the farmers would not celebrate until the harvest was all gathered in. You can see some pictures of the church here: https://www.stcatherinebirtles.org.uk/gallery.htm

This is just how I remember it, fruit and vegetables everywhere. Photograph reproduced with kind permission of Reverend Jon Hale, the Rector of the Benefice of Alderley & Birtles.


Images: Photograph. Harvest festival. (c. 2000-2020) St. Catherines, Birtles, Over Alderley, Cheshire. Photographer unknown. https://www.stcatherinebirtles.org.uk/gallery.htm : accessed 12 January 2022.

Harvest festivals have been celebrated for centuries and so it was not surprising to find that the Stewardson family living in Tansley in 1904 would have witnessed a harvest festival.

Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal Friday 30 September 1904 page 6f https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001084/19040930/149/0006 Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Robert Stewardson and Maria Batterley had married in Tansley Parish Church in 1896 and their eldest daughter was baptised at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel the following year. I think it is a safe assumption that they would have attended at least one of the numerous harvest festivals in the district and witnessed the great abundance of fruit and flowers.

It is lovely to know that they experienced an Indian Summer that September.

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52 Ancestors: Week 46 – Birthdays

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

On 2nd September 2006 my Grandmother Bessie Tomlinson turned 90 years old. To celebrate the occasion her daughter and four grandchildren visited. We arrived the evening before and had booked a visit to a professional photographer that morning. We dressed up to please Grandma.

At the time I was too broke to afford to buy prints. One hung on Grandma’s wall from then onwards though.

We returned to Grandma’s house for lunch, prepared by our partners. Grandma was a little disappointed that we hadn’t taken her out to lunch, but we explained that we didn’t know how long we would be at the photographers.

As we finished eating the doorbell rang, and Grandma was pleased to have some surprise visitors on her birthday. Now pleased that we hadn’t gone out to lunch she settled in for a chat with her visitors. But the doorbell rang again, and some other friends had arrived, and then again and some more distant relatives arrived.

While she was delighted that so many people had thought to visit her on birthday, as the consummate hostess Grandma started to get worried and started asking one or more of us to slip out to the shops to get something for tea.

More and more friends and family arrived, and Grandma was getting very worried about feeding everyone. She was very confused as we started bringing cold bags out of our cars and setting out a buffet.

Eventually we had to let on that we had invited everyone.

Grandma was delighted by her surprise birthday party.

A friend of Mum’s had made a beautiful cake.

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52 Ancestors: Week 45 – Stormy Weather

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

When I first saw this prompt I didn’t know what I would write about. I don’t recall any stories of my ancestors involving stormy weather. Then I decided to look at the newspapers. I found a story about an accident near Gosforth Railway station in which someone was killed in a storm, but eventually realised that was Gosforth near Durham, not the one in Westmorland, now Cumbria, where my ancestor Matthew Stewardson was living.

After that false start I tried again, this time finding a report of a severe storm which affected Kendal and the entire Lake District between Christmas and New Year at the end of 1908.[1] As I’ve written previously Matthew and his family were living at Rainors Farm at Gosforth at this time.[2,3] and would have experience the storm that I found.

The newspaper report that there had been signs of a snow storm on Monday evening and between 2 and 3am Tuesday morning a powdery snow began to fall. It was accompanied by high winds which caused deep snow drifts. Snow blew under some front doors leaving a inch of snow on doormats.
There does not appear to have been any damage to speak of, and the roads remained open.

The report goes on to mention that the temperature remained around -7 degrees below freezing point throughout Tuesday, so nothing would have melted.

As a farming family the Stewardson’s may have had to go out to in the blizzard to check on the livestock. I do hope they did not have to stay out long.

Even if our ancestors are not mentioned in the newspapers they can still tell us about their lives.

Oak tree viewed from bedroom windows at Rainors Farm. (c) https://www.rainorsfarm.co.uk/

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References
  1. Westmorland Gazette. (1909) A Christmas Blizzard. Roads Blocked : Trains Snowed up. Severe Storm in Kendal and the Lake District. Westmorland Gazette. 02 January. p5e https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000399/19090102/135/0005: accessed 04 January 2022.
  2. Census records. England. Gosforth, Whitehaven, Cumberland. 31 March 1901. STEWARDSON, Matthew. RG13_Pc-4897_Fo-60_Pg-4. http://ancestry.co.uk
  3. Census records. Englamd. Whitehaven, Cumberland. 02 April 1991. STEWARDSON. Matthew. RG14PN31523 RG78PN1810 RD577 SD3 ED15 SN35. http://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed 29 May 2010.

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52 Ancestors: Week 44 – Voting

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

A few days ago I shared an image from a poll book[1] showing how my 3rd great grandfather, John Middleton Downes voted in the general election on 24 November 1868. 4 years later the Ballot Act 1872 introduced secret ballots to the United Kingdom[2] but prior to that, where poll books survive, we can see how our ancestors voted.

The candidates John was choosing between were:

  • The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Milton
  • Henry F. Beaumont Esq
  • Walter Spencer Stanhope Esq
  • Lewis Randle Starkey Esq

The votes are shown in the above order by a “1” in the column.

The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Milton had served the previous term. He was a Liberal and believed that the reforms to date had been insufficient. He was one of the youngest members of parliament, and believed education should be extended so that “a proper system of instruction may be available to every child in the country”.[3]

Henry F. Beaumont Esq stood just to thwart Mr Walter Stanhope. He was also a Liberal. He wanted to see reform in parliament to increase the franchise.

Walter Spencer Stanhope Esq and Lewis Randle Starkey Esq were both Conservative candidates. They were concerned about the destruction of British institutions and the threat to “the Protestant character of our country.”

Reading the addresses of the candidates the situation in Ireland was clearly on everyone’s minds.

The simple numbers in the columns above therefore tell me quite a lot about my 3rd great grandfather and what he believe was important.

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References
  1. The Poll for the Southern Division of the West Riding of County of York. DOWNES, John Middleton. 24 November 1868. p. 189. Collection: Poll books. Society of Genealogists, London. https://sogdata.org.uk/ : accessed 28 December 2021.
  2. Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘Ballot Act 1872’. In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ballot_Act_1872&oldid=1049429027 : accessed 03 January 2022.
  3. The Poll for the Southern Division of the West Riding of County of York. Addressses of the Candidates. August 1868. image. 02-03 Collection: Poll books. Society of Genealogists, London. https://sogdata.org.uk/ : accessed 03 January 2022.

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52 Ancestors: Week 43 – Shock

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

The death of George Wadsworth, my third great grandfather must have been a shock to his family and friends.

July was the time for Sunday School outings. Many from Wickersley visited Roche Abbey, just under five miles away. It was an exciting treat for the children who were piled into waggons and set off in a procession. At the Abbey there would have been games, perhaps cricket, tea and hymn singing. Each denominational Sunday School would have gone on a different day, the Primitive Methodists one day, the Wesleyan Sunday School another day.

On Tuesday 1st July 1856 very stout George Wadsworth was talking cheerfully to his neighbour[1] as they waved off the St. Albans’s Sunday School group as they made their merry way to Roche Abbey. The treat had been paid for by rector Rev. John Foster.

Roche Abbey (c) English Heritage

As he was watching the group, which probably included his children, 14 year old Sarah Ann, 11 year old John, 3 year old Frederick George and maybe even 1 year old Mary Jane, George “reeled round and feel down dead.”[2]

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn the following day and it was ruled that he had died from apoplexy. Now, we would probably call this a stroke.

In Memory of
GEORGE WADSWORTH
who departed this life July 1st 1856
aged 38 years
Be ye ready in such an hour as this
ye think not the son of man cometh
Matt xxIV 44
also Jane (Widow) of the above
who feel asleep April 20th 1891 aged 73 years
also Frederick George youngest son of the above
who died August 30th 1920
aged 67 years
Peace Perfect Peace

George was buried the day after the inquest on 3rd July 1856.[3] Despite having an exact date of death, and knowing that he was in Wickersley at the time I have been unable to find a death certificate for George Wadsworth. There just isn’t anything, that I can find, looking at both the FreeBMD index and the newer General Register Office index just doesn’t show anything with any spelling of George or Wadsworth that I can think of, with the right age, even allowing for the discrepancy between the gravestone and the newspaper reports.

We don’t know if George’s widow Jane was with him when he collapsed, but however she found out it must have been a shock that her husband had died so quickly and so young. My next job is to find if he left a will, pre 1858 so trickier to locate!

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References
  1. Wickersley Web. http://www.wickersleyweb.co.uk/gen/wadsworth.htm : accessed 06 March 2009.
  2. Sheffield Independent. (1856) Sudden Death At Wickersley. Sheffield Independent. 05 July. p. 8d. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000181/18560705/032/0008 : accessed 01 January 2022.
  3. Burials. England. St. Albans, Wickersley, Rotherham. 03 July 1856. WADSWORTH, George. Box 1 1813 – 1863. Rotherham Archive Centre.