Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 44 – Voting

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

A few days ago I shared an image from a poll book[1] showing how my 3rd great grandfather, John Middleton Downes voted in the general election on 24 November 1868. 4 years later the Ballot Act 1872 introduced secret ballots to the United Kingdom[2] but prior to that, where poll books survive, we can see how our ancestors voted.

The candidates John was choosing between were:

  • The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Milton
  • Henry F. Beaumont Esq
  • Walter Spencer Stanhope Esq
  • Lewis Randle Starkey Esq

The votes are shown in the above order by a “1” in the column.

The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Milton had served the previous term. He was a Liberal and believed that the reforms to date had been insufficient. He was one of the youngest members of parliament, and believed education should be extended so that “a proper system of instruction may be available to every child in the country”.[3]

Henry F. Beaumont Esq stood just to thwart Mr Walter Stanhope. He was also a Liberal. He wanted to see reform in parliament to increase the franchise.

Walter Spencer Stanhope Esq and Lewis Randle Starkey Esq were both Conservative candidates. They were concerned about the destruction of British institutions and the threat to “the Protestant character of our country.”

Reading the addresses of the candidates the situation in Ireland was clearly on everyone’s minds.

The simple numbers in the columns above therefore tell me quite a lot about my 3rd great grandfather and what he believe was important.

Other posts about this family


References
  1. The Poll for the Southern Division of the West Riding of County of York. DOWNES, John Middleton. 24 November 1868. p. 189. Collection: Poll books. Society of Genealogists, London. https://sogdata.org.uk/ : accessed 28 December 2021.
  2. Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘Ballot Act 1872’. In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ballot_Act_1872&oldid=1049429027 : accessed 03 January 2022.
  3. The Poll for the Southern Division of the West Riding of County of York. Addressses of the Candidates. August 1868. image. 02-03 Collection: Poll books. Society of Genealogists, London. https://sogdata.org.uk/ : accessed 03 January 2022.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 43 – Shock

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I will do so as soon as possible.

The death of George Wadsworth, my third great grandfather must have been a shock to his family and friends.

July was the time for Sunday School outings. Many from Wickersley visited Roche Abbey, just under five miles away. It was an exciting treat for the children who were piled into waggons and set off in a procession. At the Abbey there would have been games, perhaps cricket, tea and hymn singing. Each denominational Sunday School would have gone on a different day, the Primitive Methodists one day, the Wesleyan Sunday School another day.

On Tuesday 1st July 1856 very stout George Wadsworth was talking cheerfully to his neighbour[1] as they waved off the St. Albans’s Sunday School group as they made their merry way to Roche Abbey. The treat had been paid for by rector Rev. John Foster.

Roche Abbey (c) English Heritage

As he was watching the group, which probably included his children, 14 year old Sarah Ann, 11 year old John, 3 year old Frederick George and maybe even 1 year old Mary Jane, George “reeled round and feel down dead.”[2]

An inquest was held at the White Lion Inn the following day and it was ruled that he had died from apoplexy. Now, we would probably call this a stroke.

In Memory of
GEORGE WADSWORTH
who departed this life July 1st 1856
aged 38 years
Be ye ready in such an hour as this
ye think not the son of man cometh
Matt xxIV 44
also Jane (Widow) of the above
who feel asleep April 20th 1891 aged 73 years
also Frederick George youngest son of the above
who died August 30th 1920
aged 67 years
Peace Perfect Peace

George was buried the day after the inquest on 3rd July 1856.[3] Despite having an exact date of death, and knowing that he was in Wickersley at the time I have been unable to find a death certificate for George Wadsworth. There just isn’t anything, that I can find, looking at both the FreeBMD index and the newer General Register Office index just doesn’t show anything with any spelling of George or Wadsworth that I can think of, with the right age, even allowing for the discrepancy between the gravestone and the newspaper reports.

We don’t know if George’s widow Jane was with him when he collapsed, but however she found out it must have been a shock that her husband had died so quickly and so young. My next job is to find if he left a will, pre 1858 so trickier to locate!

Other posts about this family


References
  1. Wickersley Web. http://www.wickersleyweb.co.uk/gen/wadsworth.htm : accessed 06 March 2009.
  2. Sheffield Independent. (1856) Sudden Death At Wickersley. Sheffield Independent. 05 July. p. 8d. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000181/18560705/032/0008 : accessed 01 January 2022.
  3. Burials. England. St. Albans, Wickersley, Rotherham. 03 July 1856. WADSWORTH, George. Box 1 1813 – 1863. Rotherham Archive Centre.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 42 – Sports

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m rapidly catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

My immediate family is some of the least sporty that I know. I hated P.E. at school. Standing around being hit by hockey balls and sticks, trudging through mud, never quite managing to catch the netball, always being the last to be picked for the team. Just not happy memories. I have always enjoyed swimming, and while never fast, I could keep going and swim a mile easily. In more recent times I was enjoying badminton pre-pandemic and really should try to get back into it.

I don’t take after my grandfather, Eric Tomlinson, in this respect. He really was a sportsman.

Here he is with a cricket team, he is in the middle row, 3rd from the right, wearing glasses. I think the team would be Oberon Athletic club.

He was an allrounder in cricket. Below are his 1937 Fielding Prize cup, his 1938 Batting average cup and 1940 Bowling average cup from the Oberon Athletic Club. Finally a tankard awarded in 1970 for, we think, umpiring, by Brettles, his workplace.

He also played table tennis. This clipping reports that all the best players in the county took part in the Derbyshire Championships in front of a large crow of spectators. Grandpa (known by his adoptive parents/uncle’s surname Hunt in his youth) was beaten 21-13 by F. Hill in the second round.[1]

I believe during his time in the army he played football too.

Other posts about this family


References
  1. Derby Evening Telegraph. (1938) Table Tennis Early Results in Derbyshire Championships. Derby Evening Telegraph. 08 November. p. 3g. http://www.findmypat.co.uk : accessed 19 September 2020.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 41 – Changes

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m rapidly catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

When I mentioned to Tony that today’s prompt is “changes” he immediately started singing David Bowie’s “Changes”. I was hoping for something more helpful to write a blog about, but there you go. Instead here are some of the changes that occurred during my Great Grandmother Clara Orme’s lifetime. My family history software, Legacy, helpfully provides some chronologies which I find very useful in setting my ancestors lives into context.

Clara Orme was born on 01 April 1880 in West Bromwich.[1] Queen Victoria was on the throne, Benjamin Disraeli was the Prime Minister, though he was about to be replaced by William Gladstone, and Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance was about to debut at the Strand in London.

When Clara died aged 92 on 29 December 1972[2] the world was a very different place. She had moved to Belper, Derbyshire in when she was less than year old[3], and married Charles Hunt in 1902.[4]

Photography

Photography had been invented before Clara was born, and there had been a studio in Derby from 1844.[5] By 1881 the family could have had pictures taken in near by Ripley by Abraham Booth. These would have been the thick card, credit card sized Carte-de-visite style pictures. In 1900 the Kodak Brownie went on sale, bringing photography to the masses for the first time. By 1972 a folding Polaroid camera was available.

News Reporting

When Clara was 2 years old one of the most deadly and destructive volcanic events in recorded history took place when Krakatoa began erupting on 20 May 1883. The news did not reach Britain for 4 days[6] and all the news reports are short unillustrated statements.

Just a few years after Clara died, Mount St Helens erupted in what has been called the most disastrous volcanic eruption in U. S. History.[7] It took 2 days for illustrations and dramatic headlines to appear in the British papers.[8]
In 2021 we would have had 24 hour news coverage across television, Twitter and much more.

Flight

When Clara was born hot air balloons had been gliding through the skies for about 100 years. But Clara and Charles had been married a year by the time the Wright Brothers achieved powered flight. I find it amazing to think that on 20 July 1969 she would have sat down with her son and daughter -in-law to watch the first moon landings.

Rights of Women

Clara’s mother, Martha Orme, was not allowed to own property. It was not until The Married Women’s Property Act 1882[9] that a married woman had control over her property. This law meant that unlike her mother Clara could earn money for herself, she could inherit and rent property.

The 1880s saw the first woman receive degrees in Britain and the beginning of the suffrage movement and finally in 1918 women voted in a general election. [10]

Clara did not live to see a female Prime Minister or free contraception, but much had changed for women in her lifetime. Not just women, the world was a very different place in 1972 to one in which Clara was born in 1880.

Other posts about this family


References
  1. Births. England. RD West Bromwich, Staffordshire. 01 April 1880. ORME, Clara. Vol 6b. p. 864.
  2. Testamentary records. England. 21 February 1973. HUNT, Clara. Will and grant of probate.
  3. Census Records. England. RD: Belper, Derbyshire. 03 April 181. ORME, Clara (Daur). RG11/3414. FL. 45. p. 34 SH. 20. www.familysearch.org
  4. Marriages (NCR) England. Belper, Salem Methodiist. 27 September 1902. ORME, Clara and HUNT, Charles. [Transcription]. BRO/11/008. Collection: Derbyshire Registrars Marriage Index. https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ : accessed 02 July 2010.
  5. Payne, Brett . Photographers Photographic Studios in Derbyshire, England. http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~brett/genealogy/photos/dbyphotos.html : accessed 31 December 2021
  6. London Evening Standard. (1883) General Intelligence. London Evening Standard. 24 May. p. 2f https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000609/18830524/019/0002 : accessed 31 December 2021
  7. Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens’ In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia..https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=1980_eruption_of_Mount_St._Helens&oldid=1061274083 : accessed 31 December 2021
  8. Connew, Paul. (1980) Two Shadows over America today The Power and the Fury. Daily Mirror. 20 May. p. 5 https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000560/19800520/024/0005 : accessed 31 December 2021
  9. Married Women’s Property Act 1882 (c. 75) United Kingdom. London: HMSO. https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Vict/45-46/75/enacted : accessed 31 December 2021
  10. Twile. Timeline of The history of Women’s Rights in Britain. https://twile.com/timeline/suffrage : accessed 31 December 2021.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 40 – Preservation

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m aiming to catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

As a genealogist the obvious place to go with the “Preservation” prompt would be something about storing records, but a brief chat with my family for inspiration has taken me in a completely different direction. I have written before about my maternal grandmother in the kitchen. The huge chest freezer in the pantry was a vital part of the domestic regime. The freezer, one of those big enough to hide a body, filled about half of the pantry. This was a cold store, next to the kitchen accessed from the hallway, down three or four stone steps. The floor was tiled, and there was a huge stone shelf on which salad items, homemade potted meat, butter (in the summer) and all manner of food stuffs were kept cool. There was a small fridge in the kitchen but the pantry was the place for food storage.

Whenever we stayed, until not long before Grandma had to go to live permanently in a care home there were pies and fruit desserts made from the freezer. I remember that frozen rhubarb and strawberries had to be eaten together, if one ran out we couldn’t have the other!

Grandpa was a keen gardener, and as well as strawberries and rhubarb, other fruits were grown and preserved in the freezer for use over the rest of the year. My sister remembers it being full of bags and boxes of homegrown fruit and vegetables. But Grandma didn’t just use the freezer, although it was a gamechanger for her.

Throughout my childhood the debate about Yorkshire puddings wasn’t about which meats they should be served with, but which course. They were mainly served for pudding, drenched in blackberry or raspberry vinegar. This was a very sweet homemade concoction.

Bessie Tomlinson’s recipe for blackberry vinegar. 1.5 pints blackberries, 1 pint vinegar, 1lb sugar. Put blackberries in a bowl and pour on vinegar, stand for 3 days , stir every day for 3 days, then strain through muslin. Boil with sugar for 15 mins. When cold bottle and cork well.

When we eventually cleared out the house there were plenty of Kilner jars. I don’t remember them being used, but Mum told me “Before the freezer she used to bottle things (hence all the Kilner jars). When I was a child she used to buy a whole tray of peaches to bottle. Most fruit and veg were only available in season, so preserving was much more a thing.” and “She also used to salt kidney beans to preserve them.”

Thinking about it, I may take after Grandma in some ways. I have a jar of homegrown redcurrants in honey on the kitchen worktop to spoon onto breakfast. There are homegrown apples, blackcurrants, mint and parsley in the freezer. I am not sure what Grandma would have made of kombucha which I make in Kilner jars.

If you haven’t come across Too Good to Go, do look up the App. It lets you buy and collect food that shops and restaurants would other throw away at the end of the day- at a great price – so it gets eaten instead of wasted. You don’t know exactly what’s in your order until you pick it up. Our local greengrocer wholesaler is particularly good! This box cost be £4.
In a particularly good Too Good To Go Magic bag this summer I received a honeydew melon and some fresh tarragon. I pureed the melon and froze in an ice-cube tray, and made a syrup with the tarragon. One cube of melon, mixed with white rum, tarragon syrup and either prosecco or seltzer makes a lovely cocktail!

Maybe Grandma would turn a blind eye to the alcohol and be proud that my favourite Christmas tipple this year uses preserved redcurrants in the form of vinbärssaft. I made the syrup made from homegrown redcurrants in the summer. I froze it in an ice-cube tray, one cube is the perfect amount for this cocktail.

Hard Ginger Vinbarssaft

inspired by https://schoolnightvegan.com/home/2018-11-26-hard-ginger-vinbrssaft-redcurrant-cordial-cocktail/

  • 1 tbsp Vinbärssaft
  • 50 ml whisky
  • 200 ml ginger ale/beer

Shake whisky & vinbärssaft. Pour over ice and top with ginger

Summer Kiss

inspired by https://food52.com/recipes/37140-summer-s-kiss-mojito

  • 1oz tarragon syrup
  • 4oz white rum
  • 100ml melon juice/puree

Stir/shake, poor over ice. Top up with seltzer or prosecco

Other posts about this family


Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 39 – Steps

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m aiming to catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

A couple of days ago I wrote about Charles Frederick Bowler and mentioned that he married three times. His first two wives, including my 2nd great grandmother Esther Ellis both died, the first in childbirth and then Esther aged just 25. [1]

Just over a year after he was widowed a second time 51 year old Charles married 29 year old Mary Jane Spiller in Kirk Ireton, Derbyshire.[2] In 1901 we find Charles and Mary Jane living at Manor Farm with three of Mary Jane’s step children: Elizabeth, Joseph and Rose, and the couple’s daughters’ Mabel aged 6 and Harriett aged 4.[3] 5 year old Maggie was staying with her aunt Elizabeth, Mary Jane’s sister. Mary Jane was left on her own with their daughters on 1st March 1906 when Charles died of pneumonia.[4] It was Mary Jane’s step daughter Rose who was present at the death and informed the registrar of her father’s death.

Six months after their father’s death Elizabeth Bowler (his daughter by his first marriage) and Charles’ youngest child, 9 year old Harriet Bowler boarded the SS Republic in Liverpool, bound for the USA.[5]

Immigration and Naturalization Service (USA) Passenger list for SS Republic departing Liverpool for New York. BOWLER, Harriet. 28 September 1906. Collection: Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1899-1940. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 29 December 2021

The SS Republic was “known as the “Millionaires’ Ship” because of the number of wealthy Americans who traveled by her, she was described as a “palatial liner” and was the flagship of White Star Line’s Boston service.” [6]


Image: From an old postcard. Uploaded to http://www.norwayheritage.com/ by Børge Solem. We permit the usage of images from the Norway Heritage collection under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

I then found Mary Jane in a Massachusetts City Directory:

Price & Lee Company. Holyoke South Hadley Chicopee Directory. 1944. BOWLER, Mary. J. p. 397. Collection: U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 29 December 2021

Which shows that Mary Jane also crossed the Atlantic sometime before she died in 1943. I have not yet identified her on a passenger but it looks as though I have a “step family” in Massachusetts. One day I will find the time to learn more.

Other posts about this family


References

[1] Deaths. England. RD Ashbourne, Derbyshire. 08 May 1890. BOWLER, Esther. Vol 7b. p. 362.

[2] Marriages (PR) England. Kirk Ireton, Derbyshire. 22 June 1891. BOWLER, Charles and SPILLER, Mary Jane. p. 80 entry 160. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 29 December 2021

[3] Census Records. England. St Peter, Belper, Derbyshire. 31 March 1901. BOWLER, Charles (Head). RG13/3228. FL. 67. p. 15 SH. 101. http://www.ancestry.co.uk

[4] Deaths. England. RD Belper, Derbyshire. 01 March 1906 BOWLER, Charles Frederick. Vol. 7b. p. 386.

[5] Board of Trade (Great Britain). Passenger list for Republic departing Liverpool for New York, USA. BOWLER, Elizabeth and BOWLER, Harriet. 28 September 1906. Collection: UK and Ireland, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 29 December 2021

[6] Wikipedia contributors. (2021) ‘RMS Republic (1903)’ In: Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=RMS_Republic_(1903)&oldid=1053602790 : accessed 29 December 2021

Categories
My family wildlife

12 Days of Christmas #4

The Society of Genealogists 12 days of Christmas, continues with Four Calling Birds in the Bristol Poll Book of 1852.   This inspired me to have a look at the Society’s collection of Poll Books. I found my 3rd great grandfather, John Middleton Downes. On 24 November 1868 he had the choice of voting for The Right Honourable Lord Viscount Milton, Henry F. Beaumont Esq, Walter Spencer Stanhope Esq or Lewis Randle Starkey Esq to represent the Southern Division of the West Riding of Yorkshire in parliament. Lord Milton and Mr Beaumont were elected. The poll book shows John Downes voted for winning candidates.[1] William Roddie only voted for one candidate. Several of the names listed with John Downes are familiar from my research in Wickersley.

On the fourth day of 12 Days Wild I focused on feeding birds. I cleaned the bird bath and moved to in front of my office window. I cleaned and refilled the window mounted bird feeders and replaced the empty tub of Flutter Butter.

I have a Beanies Coffee 12 Days of Christmas calendar. Day 4 was again Salted Caramel “All-in-One” so I decided to drink it this morning. The milk powder means that the coffee is a little sweeter than I prefer, and has that slightly odd taste that comes from processed milk. The “All-in-One” instant coffees are ok for emergencies and travelling but I wouldn’t choose them at home.

References

[1] The Poll for the Southern Division of the West Riding of County of York. DOWNES, John Middleton. 24 November 1868. Collection: Poll books. Society of Genealogists, London. https://sogdata.org.uk/ : accessed 28 December 2021.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 38 – Fun and Games

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m aiming to catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

The “Fun and Games” prompt reminded that I have my grandfather’s bagatelle board behind the sofa. We do occasionally get it out to play, there is a pot of ball bearings to be used with it. The game is to shoot the balls along the channel so that they roll down and fall into one of the traps marked out with nails. Different traps have different scores. Any balls that roll right to the bottom score zero.

My nephew Matthew playing with his great grandfather’s bagatelle game Christmas Eve 2017.

A bit of time on Google this morning tells me that this is a Parlour or Pin Bagatelle game, and it was hugely popular in the 1880s. It is the forerunner of the modern pinball games.[1] This particular version seems to have been manufactured in the 1930s, so it would have been Grandpa’s in his teens.[2]

When I asked Mum about the origins of the board she wasn’t sure, but said that she “much preferred the green baize one that was played with a snooker cue.” I have no memory of that game, and Mum thinks it was thrown away while she was at college as the base was damaged. Apparently it was something like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/-/224222955852 which is another form of bagatelle, also known as bar billiards.[3]

E.J. RILEY Antique Vintage Folding Table Bagatelle Board Pub Billiards Snooker sold on eBay

What games have been passed down, or lost, in your family?

Other posts about this family


References

[1] Masters Traditional Games. The Rules of Parlour/ Pin Bagatelle. https://www.mastersofgames.com/rules/parlour-bagatelle-rules.htm : accessed 28 December 2021.

[2] Severn Beach Antiques. 1930s large corinthian wooden bagatelle game with balls. http://severnbeachantiques.com/1930s-large-corinthian-wooden-bagatelle-game-balls : accessed 28 December 2021.

[3] donkeypong. Bagatelle: the Common Ancestor of Pinball and Pachinko. https://steemit.com/games/@donkeypong/bagatelle-the-common-ancestor-of-pinball-and-pachinko : accessed 28 December 2021.

Categories
My family wildlife

12 Days of Christmas #3

The Society of Genealogists 12 days of Christmas, continues with Three French Paupers in Westminster. This draws attention to settlement certificates and examinations. I have not yet used these in my own family history research but I am aware they can be a mine of information.

On the third day of 12 Days Wild and I focused on food waste, or rather not wasting food. I had bubble and squeak for tea last night, which made a second meal from left over Christmas dinner vegetables. One of my favourites. Today I made stock from the turkey carcass and froze the left over meat and cauliflower cheese. The Wildlife Trust have lots of suggestions to avoid food waste here: https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/actions/reduce-food-waste.

I have a Beanies Coffee 12 Days of Christmas calendar. Day 3 was Salted Caramel “All-in-One” which, like yesterday, I have put aside with my travel kettle.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 37- On the Farm

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should by now be writing week 52, but study, work and life got in the way. I’m aiming to catch up over the 12 days of Christmas.

I really should have looked at this prompt before writing my last blog! However, I do have other farmer ancestors. I have chosen my 2nd great grandfather Charles Frederick Bowler to write about today. He was born on 30 November 1839 in Broomyshaw, a hamlet near Cauldon, Staffordshire. He was the son of Charles Bowler, farmer, and Elizabeth Milward. [1]

In his adult life Charles Bowler described himself variously as a farmer and a cattle dealer. In 1891 when the census enumerator called he used both to describe his occupation.[2]

Extract from the 1891 Census[2]

Charles married three times, and was widowed twice. He was married to Elizabeth Johnson in 1876, to my 2nd great grandmother Esther Ellis in 1884 and finally in 1891, two months after the above census extract, he married Mary Jane Spiller. In total he had 13 children.

At the time of the census, 05 April 1891, Charles was living at Rake House, but by 1900 he was at Manor Farm, just outside Belper. It is likely that he took on the farm in 1897 when Mr Hall gave up farming.[3]

Derbyshire Times. 13 February 1897[3]

The newspapers tell us much about the farm, from the sale notice there were cows, and enough work for 3 cart horse. There were damson trees[4]

Belper News 05 October 1900[4]

and some land was let out grazing horses.[5]

Belper News and Derbyshrie Telephone 08 July 1904[5]

Charles didn’t have long at Manor Farm, probably less than 10 years. He died there on 1st March 1906. A year later his son William made an attempt to sell the farm, giving us a further insight into the farm activities.[6]

So, he farmed a variety of animals and crops.

Manor Farm
Approximately 2.02 miles from Belper in Derbyshire · © Alan Murray-Rust Photos kindly supplied by Geograph, and may be reused subject to this creative commons usage licence

Other posts about this family


References

[1] Births. England. SD Alton. RD Cheadle, Staffordshire. 30 November 1839. BOWLER, Charles Frederick. Vol 017. p. 28.

[2] Census Records. England. Kirk Ireton, Derbyshire. 05 April 1891. BOWLER, Charles (Head). RG12/2756. FL. 85. p. 15 SH. 105. http://www.ancestry.co.uk

[3] Derbyshire Times. (1897) Derbyshire Times. 13 February. p. 4f. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000228/18970213/104/0004 : accessed 27 December 2021.

[4] Belper News. (1900) Belper News. 05 October. p. 7c https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001536/19001005/088/0007 : accessed 27 December 2021.

[5] Belper News and Derbyshire Telephone. (1904) Belper News and Derbyshire Telephone. 08 July. p. 8d. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001537/19040708/212/0008 : accessed 27 December 2021.

[6] Ashbourne News Telegraph. (1907) Ashbourne News Telegraph. 18 January. p1b. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0003305/19070118/143/0001: accessed 27 December 2021.