Categories
Courses Operation Bletchley Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in August?

Pharos Intermediate Certificate

I passed the final courses for the certificate, Military Records with a pass at 73% and Victorian Crime and Punishment with a distinction at 82%. I now actually have a qualification in genealogy and feel a little less of a fraud.

Strathclyde’s Post Graduate Certificate in Genealogy, Heraldry and Palaeography

I am on a break from this course over the summer.

Heraldic terms

Through playing Heralde, (a game like the popular Wordle, but the answers are all heraldry terms) I have learned some new words.

  • Piety – Used only for pelicans, the attitude or position meaning a female pelican surrounded by chicks piercing her breast to feed them. Piety is also symbolised by blue.
  • Gyron – A triangular shape.
  • Rowel – A mullet or star like shape with 5 or 6 points, pierced in the centre
  • Label – A line across the top of a coat of arms with pendants, usually rectangular or dovetails, hanging down
  • Formy – A cross with arms that narrow towards the centre.
  • Flory – A line with a series of fleurs de lys
  • Croix – Cross
  • Torse – A torse or wreath is a twisted roll of fabric laid about the top of the helmet and at the base of the crest.

Reading

I read A Comedy of Errors, Act 2 by Michael Whitfield Foster, all about the marriage records at the GRO.

Podcasts

I am working through back catalogue of Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time, and keeping up with other podcasts.

PodcastSpeakersSubject
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 4
Ian Waller, Catherine Ryan, Sue Adams, Helen ToveyManorial and Estate Records
Journeys into Genealogy Cemeteries and GraveyardsCelia HeritageGraveyard, cemeteries, churches, the history and evolution of the churchyard, headstones, burial locations inside and outside the church, burial records inc non-conformist, consecration, the Magnificent 7 and more with author and speaker Celia Heritage. Plus tips on where to find genealogical records
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 5
Grace Tabern, Sharon Grant, Rachel Rick, Nick SerpellResearching Liverpool ancestors
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 6
Vicki Manners, Simon Fowler, Clive Reedman, Judy Lester, Sarah WilliamsPoor Law, settlement records and workhouses
Journeys into Genealogy House Histories and GenealogyMelanie Backe-HansenWhen researching your family history you are likely to want to find out more about where your ancestors lived. Expert house historian Melanie Backe-Hansen shares her experiences and gives tips for getting started, where to look including local sources (which vary from county to county), church and manorial lands, rentals and house ownership and where to find other clues such as house names. 

Meetings, Webinars, Courses

6 August
Tracing Your Female Ancestors 1: Tracing women ancestors – their voices and lives
Else ChurchillSociety of GenealogistsAs ever from Else this was a fascinating talk about how to find out the lives of women. Many of whom appear in the records merely as wives, daughters and mothers. They had lives of their own.
20 August
Tracing Your Female Ancestors 3: Milkmaids, Munitions Workers, Milliners and Match Girls: women at work
Janet FewSociety of Genealogists Janet guided us through the various jobs available to women in time gone by. I didn’t know that there had been evening classes in milking and cheese making during WW1. Sadly few records survive.
27 August
Tracing Your Female Ancestors 4: Criminal Women 1850-1920
Barry GodfreySociety of GenealogistsThis was really interesting. Women were thought to be doubly guilty because they offended against femininity as well as the crime itself. Women generally suffer more by going to prison, though this can be the suffering of their children.

A much quieter month meant that I was able to get on with some client work, tracing a family history in London which has taken me into Devon, Jersey, prison records and patent registrations. I am also working through many years of research for another client to create a coffee table book.

On 30th July we welcomed Jenga to the family. She is now 10 months old, an incredibly friendly, confident rescue cat who sleeps in some very odd positions. The orange paw is the result of playing with a wet bath bomb…

I am still dealing with menopausal symptoms though hopefully a drug will work soon. Trial and error isn’t ideal!

Categories
Courses Operation Bletchley Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in July?

Pharos Intermediate Certificate

I passed the one of the two final courses for the certificate, Military Records with a pass at 73% and I’m now just wating for my marks for Victorian Crime and Punishment.

Strathclyde’s Post Graduate Certificate in Genealogy, Heraldry and Palaeography

I intend to spend some of the summer catching up on the course reading lists.

Reading

I read Nathan Dylan Goodwin’s The Suffragette’ Secret, The Lie by Heather Dawn Gray and Are You My Grandmother by Steve Reynolds.

I have been reading “Journeys in family history : exploring your past, finding your ancestors” by Hey, David and have now moved onto “A Comedy of Errors, Act 2” by Michael Whitfield Foster, all about the marriage records at the GRO.

I also read On Chapel Sands which is the Society of Genealogists book club choice for July.

Podcasts

I am working through back catalogue of Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time, and keeping up with other podcasts.

PodcastSpeakersSubject
Journeys into Genealogy
Columnist, family history blogger and writer
Emma Cox and Paul ChiddicksPaul Chiddicks is the face behind “Dear Paul” in Family Tree Magazine and a moderator on Twitter’s #AncestryHour. He shares family history stories with research tips, discusses heirlooms and The Old Palace School Bombing in WWII.
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 6
Carol Kerry Green, Sue Adams, Cathy Soughton, Grace TabernUsing land records such as maps and tithe maps to further research
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 1
Simon Martin Mike Trenchard, Mike Sharpe, Carol Kerry Green, Nick Serpell Commissioning effective research
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 2
Susan Moore, Sarah Pettyfer, Lorraine Whale, Nick SerpellLegal & chancery records
Journeys into Genealogy The Beresford Family and Bedgebury ParkEmma Cox and Neville GallagherNeville Gallagher talks about the Beresford family of Bedgebury Park in Kent including philanthropist Alexander Beresford Hope who funded local schools and many churches in England and Ireland and was interested in the American Civil War. Plus the history of the house and estate and sources for local history and hints for getting started with researching an estate. 
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 3
Eilir Daniels, Emma Jolly, Gill Thomas, John Colclough, Antony MarrResearching Welsh ancestors
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 2 Episode 4
Ian Waller, Catherine Ryan, Sue Adams, Helen ToveyManorial and Estate Records

Meetings, Webinars, Courses

2 July
Society of Genealogists AGM and “Jones Brothers Holloway Road – the life and death of a department store”
Audrey CollinsSociety of GenealogistsI only saw the building for the first time on 1 July but it was fascinating to hear about the history of the former department store, and a connection to North Wales. I hadn’t realised that shop assistants often “lived in”.
6 July
What to Do With Your Family History: Bonus Class – Organising your Family History
Nicola WaddingtonSociety of GenealogistsA very useful session about finding better systems than endless piles of paper. Nicola had some great suggestions, though of course the final answer was that there is no right, or wrong, way to organise genealogy paperwork.
9 July
The Victorian Cook – Queen of the Kitchen and Victorian Culinary Delights
Dr Judith HillSociety of Genealogists Victorian cooks certainly worked hard! Their roles varied depending on the size of the household but it was very interesting to learn about their day and the kind of things they would have cooked.
11 July
On Chapel Sands by Laura Cummings
DiscussionSociety of GenealogistsAnother very lively discussion. This book polarised opinion more than any other so far.
14 July
Stage 2 Evening Skills Course Class 9 – Mapping Your Ancestors
Alec TrittonSociety of GenealogistsA whistle-stop tour through many maps through the years which can help with family history. Including Ordnance Survey maps, valuation maps, tithe maps, Booth’s poverty maps and many more.

This month seemed to be all about wrapping things up. I have finished the Pharos Intermediate Certificate. Term has ended at Strathclyde University, and the first two long courses I had organised for Society of Genealogists have ended. I also enjoyed a week on the Grand Union Canal.

Braunston tunnel

I once again joined in Operation Bletchley. My walking progress was somewhat hampered by a couple of migraines and hurting my back. The migraines may be symptoms of menopause, or may be side effects of the drug I have tried to deal with the symptoms of menopause. We are yet to find out!

Categories
Courses Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in June?

Pharos Intermediate Certificate

I gained 70.7 marks for 17th Century Sources, which means that so long as I score 50% or more on the two final courses I have passed the Certificate overall, as an average of 60% is required over the ten courses, and at least 50% on each class.

I am enjoying two final courses for the certificate, Military Records and Victorian Crime and Punishment. Fingers crossed that I achieve sufficient marks for a distinction , I need over 80% on both to pass the certificate with distinction.

Strathclyde’s Post Graduate Certificate in Genealogy, Heraldry and Palaeography

This term’s assessment was a narrative report on one of five research questions. I selected to write a biography of the medical professionals within a family , which was interesting. After burning some midnight oil it was handed in mid June and only a few days later I heard that I have passed with a mark of 76%. I need to work on my narrative writing and style, but I enjoyed the research part and scored well on that.

I intend to spend some of the summer catching up on the course reading lists.

Reading

I have finished the final book Nathan Dylan Goodwin’s Forensic Genealogist series, and look forward to more. I wonder if I can persuade him to talk to the Society of Genealogists book club about the Venator series?

I have also been reading “Journeys in family history : exploring your past, finding your ancestors” by Hey, David.

I also read On Chapel Sands which is the Society of Genealogists book club choice for July.

Podcasts

I used to listen to audio books while I got my breakfast and pottered about in the kitchen each morning, loading the dishwasher and sorting out my fermented drinks. For a while now though I have been listening to podcasts, and I realise that they are an important part of what I am learning each month. It might be “passive learning” without a lot of thought or effort, but it all helps. I don’t always finish an episode each day, and just carry on where I left off. Alexa seems to overlap just enough to remind me where I was up to. I have listened to the entire back catalogue of Emma Cox’s Journeys into Genealogy and look forward to a new episode every couple of weeks.
I have started on the back catalogue of Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time.

PodcastSpeakersSubject
Journeys into Genealogy
Karen Cummings and Emma CoxBoost your genealogy knowledge with Pharos Tutors
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 1
Gill Blanchard, Cathy Soughton, Gill Thomas, Lorraine Whale, Lucy BrowneHouse Histories
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 2
Antony Marr, Sarah Pettyfer, Nick Serpell, Gill ThomasGetting Started
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 3
Sharon Grant, Gill Blanchard, Grace Tabern, Simon David Martin, Sarah Williams, Gill ThomasResearch before 1837
Journeys into GenealogyEmma Cox and Chris FleetMaps, the Ordnance Survey, digitisation and more
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 4
Mike Trenchard, Les Mitchinson, Simon Fowler, Helen Tovey

Military research including British service in India
Ask AGRA: Family History Question Time
Series 1 Episode 5
Sharon Grant, Geoff Swinfield, Vicki Manners, Madeline DickensDNA in Genealogy Research

Meetings, Webinars, Courses

8 June
Creatures of the Night
North Wales Wildlife TrustThis was a really lovely evening. It was fine, and the moon was bright. There were plenty of midges around, which meant plenty of food for bats. We saw, and thanks to bat detectors, heard, a variety of bats including lesser horseshoe, soprano pipistrelle, pipistrelle and noctule. We also heard the churring of nightjar birds.
8 June
What to Do With Your Family History: Class 4 – Writing your Family History: Biographies
Janet FewSociety of GenealogistsJanet’s talk really complemented Natalie’s talk from two weeks previously about writing up a family history. Again there were plenty of suggestions for adding colour using local and national news, diaries, weather reports and much more.
11 June
Were your Ancestors Gypsies?
Beverley WalkerSociety of Genealogists I remember once being told that I may have Gypsy ancestry on my paternal grandmother’s line. Nothing has shown up in my DNA (96% English, 2% Welsh and 2% Irish!) and I have found no evidence. Beverley provided some interesting clues to look for, and I hope one day to find the origin of the rumour.
15 June
What to Do With Your Family History: Class 5 – Preserving your family history. Digital documents and photos 
Graham WalterSociety of GenealogistsA fascinating talk covering everything from not using the same password for multiple websites, types of scanners, why photography is sometime more appropriate than scanning to file naming conventions.
18 June
Exploring Your Ancestor’s Parish Church and Churchyard
Celia HeritageSociety of GenealogistsA fascinating insight into the additional clues to our ancestors lives found within the church and churchyard, besides the obvious memorials.
22 June
What to Do With Your Family History: Class 6 – Writing your family history. The legal aspects copyright and citations 
Tahitia McCabeSociety of GenealogistsThis could have been a very dry and boring topic but Tahitia made it interesting and very relevant to genealogy. I had covered much of the ground during my course with Strathclyde but it is always good to have a refresher. I must contact FindMyPast about using some images.
25 June
The Great War Dead & their Widows
Andrea Hetherington & Simon FowlerSociety of GenealogistsTwo talks that complemented each other well. I had no idea that WW1 widows had such a hard time. I will definitely be looking more into those on my tree. There is also a lot of information about the men themselves and I need to dig into these records.

Another full on month, ending with the Society of Genealogists hybrid AGM, and my first visit to London Metropolitan Archives.

Categories
Courses Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in May?

Pharos Intermediate Certificate

I completed another Pharos Course towards my Certificate: 17th Century Sources, the final assignment is written, and due in next week. I was awarded 87%, a distinction, for my work on the course: Before the Modern Census – Name-rich Sources from 1690 to 1837 which keeps me on track for a distinction.

I just have two final courses for the certificate in June, Military Records and Victorian Crime and Punishment. Fingers crossed that I achieve sufficient marks for a distinction overall.

Strathclyde’s Post Graduate Certificate in Genealogy, Heraldry and Palaeography

I passed the first assignment, and the other has been submitted for term 4. Now I have to concentrate on this term’s assessment. Assignments are pass/fail affairs, whereas assessments are graded. This term’s assessment is a narrative report on one of five research questions. I have selected to write a biography of the medical professionals within a family.

I have been learning about using DNA testing for genealogy, feudalism, armed forces, surnames, records for genealogy in Ireland, Canada and the USA, and occupational and educational sources.

Reading

I re-read Steve Robinson’s The Girl in the Painting just before the Society of Genealogists book club discussion. I’m now working my way through more of Nathan Dylan Goodwin’s Forensic Genealogist series which I find fascinating. I finished The Sterling Affair this morning, so just have one left. I believe there may be more to come though.

I have finally finished Tracing your ancestors from 1066 to 1837 : a guide for family historians by Jonathan Oates. Next on the reading pile is Journeys in family history : exploring your past, finding your ancestors by Hey, David. Published in 2004 the initial section on the internet feels very dated already.

Meetings, Webinars, Courses

3 May
Genetic Genealogy live chat session
John ClearyStrathclyde UniversityAfter spending several hours getting bogged down in SNPs, STRs, Big Y and plenty of other jargon it was good to have a chat with fellow students. Most, but not all, have done an Ancestry Autosomal DNA test, but not got much further. I don’t feel quite so behind with understanding genetic genealogy now.
4 May
In Conversation with Karen de Bruyne
Karen de BruyneFind My PastI know Karen as a volunteer host for the Society of Genealogists events. It was lovely to hear her talking about how she has become a professional genealogist, some of her family stories and her experiences in researching.
7 May
The Future of Genealogy – Young Genealogists at the Helm
Joe Saunders, Catherine Theunissen, Daniel Loftus, Flossie Kingsbury, Matthew McMaster, George Hall, Matthew Abel, Dai Davies, Shaunese Luthy, Elizabeth HodgesSociety of Genealogists & Family History FederationThis was a fabulous day and it was an honour to be part of it. The young speakers were interesting and spoke on a range of subjects. It was inspiring to listen to and I am already looking forward to the next youth conference.
14 May
How to Die Like a Victorian
Holly Carter-ChappellSociety of GenealogistsHolly explained many Victorian customs around death to us, the reasons behind the post mortem photograph, mourning rings and many more. The importance of a good Christian death to Victorian society and drawing comparisons with today. Jewellery containing a loved ones ashes are on the rise.
18 May
What to Do With Your Family History: Class 2 – Storing your Family History: Creating a personal archive
Sophie HollinsheadSociety of GenealogistsI had been hoping to learn about how to create a personal archive, and some tips for organising the contents. Sophie took us through the archive collections she had created for some of her projects over the years and the serendipitous findings made from them.
19 May
Encounters with Barn Owls
Chris WynneNorth Wales Wildlife TrustA lovely look at barn owls in North Wales. I didn’t know that the majority of their diet was the short-tailed vole.
21 May
Same Sex Love, 1700-1957: History and Research Sources for Family Historians
Gill RossiniSociety of GenealogistsA fascinating talk which raised some interesting questions and thoughts. Not all loving same sex relationships are homosexual. Were there 18th and 19th century sapphic marriages or is there something we don’t know happening in the registers?
23 May
Book Club – The Girl in the Painting by Steve Robinson
Discussion, no speakerSociety of GenealogistsI think we were quite split over this book. I loved it, and will continue to read all of Steve’s books. Others were disappointed not to learn anything from it.
25 May
What to Do With Your Family History: Class 3 – Sharing your Family History: Writing the stories
Natalie PithersSociety of GenealogistsNatalie presented a workshop style talk to help us to write stories about our ancestors. We thought through the writing process, why and where to write, and how to add colour to stories of even the most “boring” ancestors.
26 May
Stage 2 Skills Course: Class 6 – Immigration to England
Janet FewSociety of GenealogistsThis was a fascinating talk and I am so glad I joined in. Although I completed Stage 2 of the skills course last year our change around has meant that this topic was not previously covered. Janet took us through an overview of why migration happens, and then highlighted three groups of immigrants to England. Finally we thought about the impact of immigration to the existing community.
28 May
Are you related to Royalty?
Caroline GurneySociety of GenealogistsThe simple answer appears to be yes! Whether or not it is possible to trace a line of descent, we are probably all related to royalty somehow.

I had a lot happening in work at the Society of Genealogists so it has felt like a very busy month even if the above does not reflect that. With two Pharos courses June is likely to be busy too, but I can look forward to a break in July and August.

Categories
Courses Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in April?

Where on earth did April go?

I spent the first week ws leading a Ffestiniog Travel tour to Mallorca, which despite Easyjet’s best efforts to throw a spanner in the works, went very well. As I was on the train to Gatwick an email popped up, EasyJet had cancelled the following mornings direct flight to Palma. I contacted the lovely office staff, who then spent the remainder of their Sunday afternoon rebooking 17 seats on flights from Gatwick to Palma, the result was 6 hours at Madrid airport, not an ideal start to the tour, but we survived. It was lovely to feel the sun on my skin again!

I then spent a week at home catching up with SoG work, and writing an assignment, before another trip away. This time to the New Forest to visit my sister, and look after my nephew for a few days.

I completed another Pharos Course towards my Intermediate Certificate: Before the Modern Census – Name-rich Sources from 1690 to 1837. I have just begun 17th Century Sources, and then have two final courses for the certificate in June.

I scored 78% on my third term assessment for Strathclyde’s Post Graduate Certificate in Genealogy, Heraldry and Palaeography. Not quite as good as the second term, but I am still pleased. Term four, with a focus on Family History Studies and Overseas records began just as I got home from Mallorca. With another week away, and a lot going on at Society of Genealogists I do not yet feel I have a handle on the work this term.

I read Steve Robinson’s The Girl in the Painting for the Society of Genealogists bookclub. Another great offering in the Jefferson Tayte series. Still ongoing is Tracing your ancestors from 1066 to 1837 : a guide for family historians by Jonathan Oates, but I didn’t take this with me on my travels, as it is a library book rather than on my Kindle so progress has been slow. I read the first in the Maze Investigations – The Genealogy Detectives series, Three Times Removed which I really enjoyed, and will suggest to the bookclub. I also indulged my love of Jane Austen fanfiction to read Shana Granderson’s Unknown Family Connections which had a slight genealogy theme.

Meetings, Webinars, Courses etc this month:

2 April
Hidden in the Newsprint
Mia BennettSociety of GenealogistsAn interesting look at the many things that can be found in newspapers to enhance family history research.
2 April
My Ancestor was a Liar: Ignorance, Half-truths or Wilful Deceit?
David AnnalSociety of GenealogistsWere our ancestors lying, or was it ignorance? Why did they give a different age in every census return? Some interesting thoughts.
13 April
Social Chat: Tall Tales from our Ancestors: Erroneous information & Family Lies
Else ChurchillSociety of GenealogistsA fun discussion about our ancestors and the information they left behind.
21 April
Stage 2 Skills Course. Class 1. I’m stuck. Techniques for localising the elusive ancestor
Else ChurchillSociety of GenealogistsI enjoyed hosting the first class of the first course I have put together for SoG. Having taken this course previously it was a reminder, but a useful one, that even when stuck there are always more places to look.
30 April
Posted in the Past
Helen BaggottSociety of GenealogistsWe read this Helen’s book for the SoG bookclub. This seminar was a more in-depth look at the recipients of some of the postcards in the first two books. Very interesting and it has inspired me to look out for old postcards sent to or from Pentrefelin.

Another very full month, lovely to spend some time away from home, and see the sunshine. I am going to have to get my head down to studying in May!

Categories
Courses Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in March?

I am settling in at the Society of Genealogists. The Stage 2 Evening Skills course I have arranged begins next month, and soon to be advertised are Stage 3, a course about researching ancestors in the seventeenth century and one on London geography and repositories.

I have gained another distinction in the Pharos Course Building on a Solid Foundation, and have been studying another course towards my Intermediate Certificate: Before the Modern Census – Name-rich Sources from 1690 to 1837. I’ll be handing in my assessments for this course once I am back from Mallorca in April.

I completed the assignments for this term at Strathclyde early in the month which left plenty of time for the big main assessment. As I mentioned last month it is another “do some genealogy” task. We have been given two individuals and scarce details about them and a common ancestor. The assignment is all about filling in the gaps. I really enjoyed working on this and hope to get a reasonable mark.

I finished Helen Baggott’s Posted in the Past for the Society of Genealogists book club. Still ongoing is Tracing your ancestors from 1066 to 1837 : a guide for family historians by Jonathan Oates.

I helped out in the Expert Booth at RootsTech for the Register of Qualified Genealogists, but it was very quiet! I also really enjoyed the 24 hours of talks on the HistoryForUkraine event, some great speakers and a lot of money raised.

Meetings, Webinars, Courses etc this month:

7 March
Using the FamilySearch Catalog
FamilySearchI struggle to use the Family Search catalog but there is a wealth of information in it and I really should use it much more. This helped me to find the information that is available.
12 March
Mummy, What did you do in the Great War? My ancestor was a woman at War.
Emma JollySociety of GenealogistsA fascinating look a the role women played during the first world war, and how to find the records.
15 March
Getting Started with Entrepreneurship
Dr Kate Smith of Credo AcademyStrathclyde UniversityA good confidence booster as I start my business.
15 March
Nature Reserve update: Gwaith Powdwr (springing into action)
North Wales Wildlife TrustIt was lovely to see all that is going on at Gwaith Powdwr and the work being done to view and protect bats.
16 March
Lunchtime Chat – Tracing Female Ancestors – Why are we neglecting half of our Ancestors
Else ChurchillSociety of GenealogistsIt is always very unpredictable what direction these chats will take. We ended up talking about how women took their husband’s nationality. I do enjoy hosting these.
26 March
New Ways of Using Census Microdata to Research Social History
Dr Lesley TrotterSociety of GenealogistsA very interesting talk about using census data to inform one place studies and similar research. Using databases is the key to analysis.

Between working for SoG, a Pharos course with a lot packed into it, an assessment for Strathclyde and starting to do some research for clients it has been a very full, but satisfying month.

Categories
My family

Robert Humphrey Hopkinson 1923-1986 – The update

It has been a busy couple of weeks. Else Churchill is packing a huge amount into the Pharos course that I am working on, together with client work, putting courses together for Society of Genealogists and an assessment due for Strathclyde University hasn’t left a lot of time for my own research.

Coming back to my To-Do list for my grandfather:

  1. Order birth certificate. Received. More detail completed for his birth.
  2. Locate death certificate. A copy received from my aunt and cousin. Detail completed in time time.
  3. Investigate using electoral registers when he moved from Foundry Lane to The Common. This will involve a visit to the Derbyshire Record Office in Matlock.
  4. Look at newspapers for more information about his accident. Nothing in British Newspaper Archive. Another for Derbyshire Record Office.
  5. Investigate if Richard Johnson and Nephew records are accessible and view them if possible. As far as I can tell staff records have not survived.
  6. Investigate if more information about pre-war work as a farm labourer is available.
  7. Order the will of Mary Barratt died 27 June 1957. Ordered
  8. Look for a baptism record.
  9. Learn more about RAF service. I know the family have the records but I have not read them yet.
  10. NEW Investigate records of Queen Mary Nursing Home. It appears nothing before 1940 survives
DateAgeEventPlaceSources
about 1870Richard Johnson and Nephew Wireworks built in Ambergate. “Richard Johnson & Nephew Wireworks at Ambergate was a major employer of men and women from Crich Parish.”16
1920-1921Ireland partitioned into the Free State and the province of Northern Ireland
29 June 19230Birth. Son of Thomas Humphrey HOPKINSON and Adelaide May STEWARDSON. Born Queen Mary Nursing Home, Derby. His father was a grocers assistant and the family lived at The Bungalow, Whatstandwell, Belper. His mother registered his birth on 27 July 1923. See Picture The Past for a picture of the nursing home. Derby, Derbyshire1, 2
28 February 19262Birth of spouse, Norah May BOWLERBelper, Derbyshire
27 February 19273Birth of sister, Adelaide “Myrtle” HOPKINSONBelper, Derbyshire
20 January 193612George V dies and Edward VIII becomes King.
10 December 193613Edward VIII abdicates to marry Wallace Simpson. George VI accedes to the throne.
20 May 193713Death of mother, Adelaide May Hopkinson, from throat cancer.Blackbrook, Milford, Derbyshire
03 September 193916Outbreak of World War 2
29 September 193916Occupation : farm labourerCrich, Derbyshire6
29 September 1939 – 15 October 194716Lived at 102 The CommonCrich, Derbyshire6, 13, 14
25-26 July 194118Selection for RAF 7
04 September 1941 – 14 September 194618Served in RAF Volunteer Force. Reached rank of Corporal. Trade ARM: Bomb disposalDispersal Centre: Hednesford7
10 May 194521Overseas military service commenced.7
Abt February 194622Marriage of sister to Herbert SlaterBelper, Derbyshire
29 November 194623Military discharge7
28 September – 12 October 194724Marriage banns calledBelper, Derbyshire13
15 October 194724Married Norah May Bowler at the parish church at 2:30pm.
He was working as a fitter at this time. Marriage witnesses William Leslie Webb and Glenda Ann Hopkinson.
Belper, Derbyshire13, 14
4 June 194824Birth of sonBelper, Derbyshire
27 August 195027Accident at work, Richard Johnson and Nephew wireworks. His arm was caught in a machine, badly mangling it and requiring extensive surgery. He worked as a die grinder.Ambergate, Derbyshire8. 9, 10
27 August 195027Lived at 7 Foundry LaneMilford, Belper, Derbyshire10
06 February 195228George VI died and Queen Elizabeth II becomes Queen.
15 February 195329Birth of daughterBelper, Derbyshire
02 September 195734Inherited £50 from great aunt Mary BARRATT11
196138Moved from 102 The Common to 53 Over LaneOpenwoodgate, Belper3, 4, 5, 12
11 August 196138Birth of daughterBelper, Derbyshire
28 December 196441Birth of sonBelper, Derbyshire
24 August 196845Marriage of son at St Peters parish churchBelper, Derbyshire
197248Marriage of daughter
August 197349Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
09 August 197450Birth of granddaughterKent
29 January 197652Death of fatherOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
07 December 197753Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
16 June 197955Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
198057Death of sonOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
09 September 198057Wrote a willBelper, Derbyshire4
198158Remarriage of daughter
07 December 198259Birth of grandchild
198360Marriage of daughterOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
25 December 198562Birth of grandchildCheshire
11 August 198663Died at Derby Royal Infirmary from a chest infection and carcinoma lung. My father registered the death on 13 August 1986. Derby, Derbyshire1, 3
07 October 198663Probate, his estate was left to his widowManchester3, 4

I have left out some detail concerned living people to protect privacy.

There is plenty more I can learn but time to move on to another ancestor.

(c) Ruth Willmore. The link from Robert Hopkinson to Ruth Willmore

If you knew any of the people mentioned or have any other information you think I would be interested in I would love to hear from you. familyhistory@rhoshelyg.me.uk or comment below.

More about Robert Humphrey Hopkinson

52 Ancestors: Week 1 Beginnings

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021! The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. This week’s prompt, “Beginnings” is of course a good place to start. I am planning that 2021 is the year I begin again with my family history […]

52 Ancestors: Week 50 – Lines

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I’m nearly there. I was not sure where to take this prompt and decided to type “Lines” […]

52 Ancestors: Week 2 Family Legends

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. This week the prompt is Family Legends. There are two stories I was told about my father’s side of the family. One that he was the oldest […]


References

  1. Deaths (CR) England and Wales. Derby RD. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey. 1986. Vol. 6. p. 736.
  2. Births (CR) England and Wales. Derby RD. HOPKINSON, Robert. 3rd Q., 1923. Vol. 7b. p. 1055.
  3. Testamentary records. England. 07 October 1986. HOPKINSON, Robert. Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the grans of probate. https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk : accessed 20 December 2020.
  4. Testamentary records. England. 07 October 1986. HOPKINSON, Robert. Will.
  5. Hopkinson, Bill. (2014) My Great Grandfather2. Email, 22 October.
  6. 1939 Register, England. Crich Common, Derbyshire. HOPKINSON, Robert. Schedule 51/2. RG101/3084G/008/32. National Archives (Great Britain), Kew, England. Collection: 1939 Register. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 11 May 2020.
  7. Cresswell, Vicki. (2005) Re: Granpa. Email, 10 August, 10:38.
  8. Bowler, Bett. (2010) Re: Hopkinson. Email, 22 August, 15:27.
  9. Hopkinson, Bill. (2014) My Great Grandfather. Email, 21 October.
  10. Derby Daily Telegraph. (1950) Ambergate Accident. Derby Daily Telegraph. 28 August. p. 12c. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000521/19500828/062/0012 : accessed 21 December 2020.
  11. Hawksley, Thomas Edgar (?). Probate calculations. BARRATT, Mary. 27 June 1957. Collection: Ruth Willmore.
  12. Directories. England. (1984) Phone book: Derby. British Telecom. p. 212. Collection: British phone books 1880-1984 from the collection held by BT Archives. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 26 October 2014.
  13. Banns (PR). England. Belper, St Peter, Derbyshire. 28 September 1947. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey and BOWLER, Norah May. Derby Records Office, Matlock, Derbyshire.
  14. Marriages (CR) England. Belper, Derbyshire. 15 October 1947. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey and BOWLER, Norah May. Vol. 3a. p. 130.
  15. Images: Photograph. Wedding of Robert HOPKINSON and Norah BOWLER. 15 October 1947. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Colourised by Ian Cresswell. Private collection of Vicky and Ian Cresswell, Belper. [Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
  16. Patilla, Peter. Johnson and Nephew Ambergate Wireworks. http://www.crichparish.co.uk/newwebpages/wireworks2.html : accessed 06 February 2022.
  17. Images: Photograph. Robert HOPKINSON and Norah BOWLER with Ruth HOPKINSON. 1974. Location unknown. Photographer Bill Hopkinson[?]. Private collection of Ruth Willmore [Photograph of a couple holding a young child.]
  18. Images: Photograph. Wedding of Bill HOPKINSON and Vera TOMLINSON. 24 August 1968. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Private collection of Ruth Willmore. [Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
  19. Images: Photograph. Bob and Norah HOPKINSON with son Bill HOPKINSON. 24 August 1968. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Private collection of Ruth Willmore. [Detail from Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
Categories
My family

Robert Humphrey Hopkinson 1923-1986

As I have finally completed the #52Ancestors challenge I have decided to move on to a “do over” of my family history research, one ancestor at a time. For each one I will be checking the accuracy of my research to date from what I have learned, looking for any gaps in my knowledge about them and working out what else I can find out about them.

I have decided to start with my paternal grandfather Robert Humphrey Hopkinson.

(c) Ruth Willmore. The link from Robert Hopkinson to Ruth Willmore

Now though I want to focus on checking my research and identifying the gaps. One good way to do this is to build a timeline.

DateAgeEventPlaceSources
about 1870Richard Johnson and Nephew Wireworks built in Ambergate. “Richard Johnson & Nephew Wireworks at Ambergate was a major employer of men and women from Crich Parish.”16
1920-1921Ireland partitioned into the Free State and the province of Northern Ireland
29 June 19230Birth. Son of Thomas Humphrey HOPKINSON and Adelaide May STEWARDSON.Derby, Derbyshire1, 2
28 February 19262Birth of spouse, Norah May BOWLERBelper, Derbyshire
27 February 19273Birth of sister, Adelaide “Myrtle” HOPKINSONBelper, Derbyshire
20 January 193612George V dies and Edward VIII becomes King.
10 December 193613Edward VIII abdicates to marry Wallace Simpson. George VI accedes to the throne.
20 May 193713Death of mother, Adelaide May Hopkinson, from throat cancer.Blackbrook, Milford, Derbyshire
03 September 193916Outbreak of World War 2
29 September 193916Occupation : farm labourerCrich, Derbyshire6
29 September 1939 – 15 October 194716Lived at 102 The CommonCrich, Derbyshire6, 13, 14
25-26 July 194118Selection for RAF 7
04 September 1941 – 14 September 194618Served in RAF Volunteer Force. Reached rank of Corporal. Trade ARM: Bomb disposalDispersal Centre: Hednesford7
10 May 194521Overseas military service commenced.7
Abt February 194622Marriage of sister to Herbert SlaterBelper, Derbyshire
29 November 194623Military discharge7
28 September – 12 October 194724Marriage banns calledBelper, Derbyshire13
15 October 194724Married Norah May Bowler at the parish church at 2:30pm.
He was working as a fitter at this time. Marriage witnesses William Leslie Webb and Glenda Ann Hopkinson.
Belper, Derbyshire13, 14
4 June 194824Birth of sonBelper, Derbyshire
27 August 195027Accident at work, Richard Johnson and Nephew wireworks. His arm was caught in a machine, badly mangling it and requiring extensive surgery. He worked as a die grinder.Ambergate, Derbyshire8. 9, 10
27 August 195027Lived at 7 Foundry LaneMilford, Belper, Derbyshire10
06 February 195228George VI died and Queen Elizabeth II becomes Queen.
15 February 195329Birth of daughterBelper, Derbyshire
02 September 195734Inherited £50 from great aunt Mary BARRATT11
196138Moved from 102 The Common to 53 Over LaneOpenwoodgate, Belper3, 4, 5, 12
11 August 196138Birth of daughterBelper, Derbyshire
28 December 196441Birth of sonBelper, Derbyshire
24 August 196845Marriage of son at St Peters parish churchBelper, Derbyshire
197248Marriage of daughter
August 197349Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
09 August 197450Birth of granddaughterKent
29 January 197652Death of fatherOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
07 December 197753Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
16 June 197955Birth of grandchildDerbyshire
198057Death of sonOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
09 September 198057Wrote a willBelper, Derbyshire4
198158Remarriage of daughter
07 December 198259Birth of grandchild
198360Marriage of daughterOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire
25 December 198562Birth of grandchildCheshire
11 August 198663DiedOpenwoodgate, Belper, Derbyshire1, 3
07 October 198663Probate, his estate was left to his widowManchester3, 4

I have left out some detail concerned living people to protect privacy. Looking through the timeline I have most of the essential information but have the following to do list:

  1. Order birth certificate. This will provide more information about his parents and early home. It will confirm his birth date, though I am confident this is correct as his children told me.
  2. Locate death certificate. This will confirm his date, place and cause of death and may provide other useful information, we must have a copy of this in the family!
  3. Investigate using electoral registers when he moved from Foundry Lane to The Common.
  4. Look at newspapers for more information about his accident.
  5. Investigate if Robert Johnson and Nephew records are accessible and view them if possible.
  6. Investigate if more information about pre-war work as a farm labourer is available.
  7. Order the will of Mary Barratt died 27 June 1957.
  8. Look for a baptism record.
  9. Learn more about RAF service. I know the family have the records but I have not read them yet.
William Leslie Webb, Bob Hopkinson, Norah Hopkinson, William Bowler, Glen Hopkinson. Small bridesmaids Cath and Pen Curtis. Image coloured by Ian Cresswell. [15]

If you knew any of the people mentioned or have any other information you think I would be interested in I would love to hear from you. familyhistory@rhoshelyg.me.uk or comment below.

More about Robert Humphrey Hopkinson

52 Ancestors: Week 1 Beginnings

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021! The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. This week’s prompt, “Beginnings” is of course a good place to start. I am planning that 2021 is the year I begin again with my family history […]

52 Ancestors: Week 50 – Lines

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. I should have completed all 52 prompts by now, but I’m nearly there. I was not sure where to take this prompt and decided to type “Lines” […]

52 Ancestors: Week 2 Family Legends

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. This week the prompt is Family Legends. There are two stories I was told about my father’s side of the family. One that he was the oldest […]


References

  1. Deaths index (CR) England and Wales. Derby RD. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey. 1986. Vol. 6. p. 736. http://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed ?
  2. Births index (CR) England and Wales. Derby RD. HOPKINSON, Robert. 3rd Q., 1923. Vol. 7b. p. 1055. http://www.findmypast.co.uk : accessed ?
  3. Testamentary records. England. 07 October 1986. HOPKINSON, Robert. Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the grans of probate. https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk : accessed 20 December 2020.
  4. Testamentary records. England. 07 October 1986. HOPKINSON, Robert. Will.
  5. Hopkinson, Bill. (2014) My Great Grandfather2. Email, 22 October.
  6. 1939 Register, England. Crich Common, Derbyshire. HOPKINSON, Robert. Schedule 51/2. RG101/3084G/008/32. National Archives (Great Britain), Kew, England. Collection: 1939 Register. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 11 May 2020.
  7. Cresswell, Vicki. (2005) Re: Granpa. Email, 10 August, 10:38.
  8. Bowler, Bett. (2010) Re: Hopkinson. Email, 22 August, 15:27.
  9. Hopkinson, Bill. (2014) My Great Grandfather. Email, 21 October.
  10. Derby Daily Telegraph. (1950) Ambergate Accident. Derby Daily Telegraph. 28 August. p. 12c. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000521/19500828/062/0012 : accessed 21 December 2020.
  11. Hawksley, Thomas Edgar (?). Probate calculations. BARRATT, Mary. 27 June 1957. Collection: Ruth Willmore.
  12. Directories. England. (1984) Phone book: Derby. British Telecom. p. 212. Collection: British phone books 1880-1984 from the collection held by BT Archives. http://ancestry.co.uk : accessed 26 October 2014.
  13. Banns (PR). England. Belper, St Peter, Derbyshire. 28 September 1947. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey and BOWLER, Norah May. Derby Records Office, Matlock, Derbyshire.
  14. Marriages (CR) England. Belper, Derbyshire. 15 October 1947. HOPKINSON, Robert Humphrey and BOWLER, Norah May. Vol. 3a. p. 130.
  15. Images: Photograph. Wedding of Robert HOPKINSON and Norah BOWLER. 15 October 1947. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Colourised by Ian Cresswell. Private collection of Vicky and Ian Cresswell, Belper. [Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
  16. Patilla, Peter. Johnson and Nephew Ambergate Wireworks. http://www.crichparish.co.uk/newwebpages/wireworks2.html : accessed 06 February 2022.
  17. Images: Photograph. Robert HOPKINSON and Norah BOWLER with Ruth HOPKINSON. 1974. Location unknown. Photographer Bill Hopkinson[?]. Private collection of Ruth Willmore [Photograph of a couple holding a young child.]
  18. Images: Photograph. Wedding of Bill HOPKINSON and Vera TOMLINSON. 24 August 1968. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Private collection of Ruth Willmore. [Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
  19. Images: Photograph. Bob and Norah HOPKINSON with son Bill HOPKINSON. 24 August 1968. Belper, Derbyshire. Photographer unknown. Private collection of Ruth Willmore. [Detail from Group photograph of wedding party outside St Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire.]
Categories
Courses Society of Genealogists

What have I learned in February?

I have been learning how to set up and administrate courses for the Society of Genealogists. There is quite an overlap with setting up group tours for Ffestiniog Travel, but a substantial difference too. So, plenty to learn, and enjoy.

I have completed and passed the Pharos Course Apprenticeship Records and have finished Building on a Solid Foundation, though don’t yet have my marks back. The latter especially has been really interesting and made me consider my research techniques.

My Strathclyde course this month has mainly been about maps and geographic locations. There was also a fascinating “lecture” on old money, coins, weights and measures. I have passed the first assignment of the term, apparently our collaborative group worked together better than most who were set the same exercise. I just have some editing to do before handing in my second assignment of the term, so next month will be all about the big assignment for this Module. We have been given two individuals and a scarce details about them and a common ancestor. The assignment is all about filling in the gaps. I have already got stuck into the research and I am enjoying puzzling it out.

I am reading Helen Baggott’s Posted in the Past for the Society of Genealogists book club. I have also read Annie’s Ancestors by Sarah J. Homer this month. Also ongoing is Tracing your ancestors from 1066 to 1837 : a guide for family historians by Jonathan Oates.

Meetings, Webinars, Courses etc this month:

19 February
Same Sex Love, 1700–1957: History and Research Sources for Family Historians
Gill RossiniSociety of GenealogistsSadly cancelled. I’m looking forward to it being rescheduled.
19 February
Scottish Research Resources before 1800
Chris PatonSociety of GenealogistsA fascinating talk, in which Chris Paton made it clear that Scotland is not England. He then gave us a “toolkit” of resources for early Scottish research and explained many of the differences in terminology. A very useful session.
24 February
On the Right Track: Researching Railway Workers
Ian WallerSociety of GenealogistsIan provided many suggestions of places to research my railway ancestors. I do not have many, but railways are a big part of my life so I find them particularly interesting.
26 February
My Ancestor was on the 1921 Census – Well, they should have been!
John HansonSociety of GenealogistsJohn was able to provide insights into using the 1921 Census that anyone employed by Find My Past would not offer. I am very much looking forward to it being included in a subscription rather than pay per view.

It was a deliberate decision to slow down and take fewer classes this month. Pharos and Strathclyde are both keeping me busy studying and I needed to concentrate on settling into my new job as well as starting a business.

Categories
My family

52 Ancestors: Week 52 – Future

I am taking part in the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge for 2021. The challenge is organised by Amy Johnson Crow who provides a weekly writing prompt. It has taken me longer than it should but here is the last post in this series.

I didn’t feel qualified to write about the future of our family, so I had a video chat with my nephew Matthew.

He told me that he plans to have one child, as he likes not having brothers and sisters as you don’t have to argue with them. He does like arguing with his Mum though, and when I asked if he thought his child would argue with him he said, “no, they’ll argue with their Mum.”

I asked if he thought he would live in England or Wales like his cousins but he hadn’t thought about that. He would like to see his cousins a couple of times a year as he does now.

Matthew’s career plans reflect the age in which he is growing up. He would like to be a part time gamer on YouTube, and part time scientist. He told me he would like to be the kind of scientist that invents things. His aims are to invent a kind of gun that when you shoot people it changes their age. His other ambition is to invent a time machine.

Matthew is very conscious that time machines would have to be used with care. His main purpose would be to go back in time to prevent murders and other bad things happening. He thought that getting murderers to hit something that prevented a killing taking place would be a good idea. He mentioned that very slight changes to the past could result in people being extinct so it would be important to make only very small changes. I think he has taken some lessons from “Back To The Future.”

Matthew thought that when he is an adult we will still be driving petrol and diesel powered cars, but they might be more eco. We might have sent people to Mars, but only just. Things will not change all that much.

Matthew pointed out that my blog about the future can only be a prediction, I would need his time machine to actually have a sneak preview and to be able to tell you what the future actually looks like.

Other #52Ancestors posts